Hosting


Business website hosting is a specific quality of hosting service dedicated to the needs of business.  But it does not differ from web hosting in general, which is the service that makes your website available on the Internet.   As such business web hosting is specialized towards the marketing of your business online and the hosting of your online business.

With the Internet connecting nearly every household and office worldwide, business website hosting services are a strategic part of every businesses operations.   Today, more than ever,  Businesses need to get online not only to have an eCommerce website,  where people can buy your goods and services, but also to promote your business and help generate and qualify leads.   While many of us have used an online shopping cart and payment processing system, this is not the only purpose for a business website.  Commonly referred to as eCommerce website hosting this is only one aspect to Business website hosting not the least of which is promotion of your company or organisation.  Furthermore business website hosting provides you a way to give your clients, customers and partners more detailed information about your products and services.

High Availability HostingThink of it as 24/7 sales team, a round the clock marketing campaign and a always on customer support center.    For pennies a day your can extend your business hours, deepen your customer relationships and challenge even your largest competitors.

There are many web hosting companies that provide facilities for  business website hosting.  Apart from hosting the websites, these companies also provide the services of website planning, designing and deployment along with SEO and/or marketing services.  With BCwebnet Business website hosting you pay a fixed amount of money per month to host your website and inform clients and partners about your business or the service that you provide.  So what this means is even businesses of modest budgets can get quality service at a reasonable price.

BCwebnet offers two business web hosting services that differ only in their delivery platforms; that is the type of servers and more specifically how those servers are configured.   We offer a traditional shared hosting service for budget conscious businesses and a high availability hosting service for those business who really rely on this online presence.   While larger organizations have dedicated servers at their disposal for hosting their websites, such expenses are not generally feasible for small businesses and non-profit organisations.  However, BCwebnet was started on the foundation that responsible hosting means providing the best service possible for the budget of  the client.  We are in the business of hosting websites and make every cost effective effort to ensure websites are delivered within our uptime guarantees.

Our highly available hosting solutions are a further testament to that commitment.   But not every consumer can afford a high availability hosting service.  However, for those that can they get the piece of mind that their website is hosted on a platform designed specifically to provide 99.9% uptime (three 9s), which allows for about 45 minutes per month of unscheduled interruption.  Most of our services achieve well over 99.9% uptime but for High Availability Business Hosting plan we provide a 100% guarantee on this commitment.

Business website hosting has the capability of giving your business a big boost.  The right choice is a sound hosting platform on which everything else depends.   So give your company or organisation the advantage its deserves and get online today with us.

To get more information about our affordable business website hosting plans please visit: http://www.bcwebnet.com/

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APC – Power Event Definitions, Causes and Effects.

Sags:

Also known as brownouts, sags are short term decreases in voltage levels. This is the most common power problem, accounting for 87% of all power disturbances according to a study by Bell Labs.

    CAUSE -

    Sags are usually caused by the start-up power demands of many electrical devices (including motors, compressors, elevators, shop tools, etc.) Electric companies use sags to cope with extraordinary power demands. In a procedure known as rolling brownouts, the utility will systematically lower voltage levels in certain areas for hours or days at a time. Hot Summer days, when air conditioning requirements are at their peak, will often prompt rolling brownouts.

    EFFECT -

    A sag can starve a computer of the power it needs to function, and cause frozen keyboards and unexpected system crashes which both result in lost or corrupted data. Sags also reduce the efficiency and life span of electrical equipment, particularly motors.

Blackout:

Total loss of utility power.

    CAUSE -

    Blackouts are caused by excessive demand on the power grid, lightning storms, ice on power lines, car accidents, backhoes, earthquakes and other catastrophies.

    EFFECT -

    Current work in RAM or cache is lost. The hard drive File Allocation Table (FAT) may also be lost, which results in total loss of data stored on drive.

Spike:

Also referred to as an impulse, a spike is an instantaneous, dramatic increase in voltage. Akin to the force of a tidal wave, a spike can enter electronic equipment through AC, network, serial or phone lines and damage or completely destroy components.

    CAUSE -

    Spikes are typically caused by a nearby lightning strike. Spikes can also occur when utility power comes back on line after having been knocked out in a storm or as the result of a car accident.

    EFFECT -

    Catastrophic damage to hardware occurs. Data will be lost.

Surge:

A short term increase in voltage, typically lasting at least 1/120 of a second.

    CAUSE -

    Surges result from presence of high-powered electrical motors, such as air conditioners, and household appliances in the vicinity. When this equipment is switched off, the extra voltage is dissipated through the power line.

    EFFECT -

    Computers and similar sensitive electronic devices are designed to receive power within a certain voltage range. Anything outside of expected peak and RMS (considered the average voltage) levels will stress delicate components and cause premature failure.

Noise:

More technically referred to as Electro-Magnetic Interference (EMI) and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), electrical noise disrupts the smooth sine wave one expects from utility power.

    CAUSE -

    Electrical noise is caused by many factors and phenomena, including lightning, load switching, generators, radio transmitters and industrial equipment. It may be intermittent or chronic.

    EFFECT -

    Noise introduces glitches and errors into executable programs and data files.

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The Problem With Power.

The Problem with Power

We live in the Information Age where countless data is created, transmitted, and stored. We live in the Electronics Age where numerous electric-powered machines aid in business and household tasks, as well as entertain and inform us.

The reality of living in this time of technological innovation is that the power to run these machines can’t keep up (at least not yet). In many locations around the world, electricity generation, transmission and distribution have not evolved at the same pace as computer and communications equipment. What was built years ago for powering factories producing manufactured goods is struggling to adapt to provide continuous, sufficient-grade power to sensitive electronics processing valuable information.

What Is a Power Event?

Sags, surges, noise, spikes, blackouts…what really happens to connected devices when they experience a power anomaly? A lightning strike is a frequent example, although it is just one of countless problems that can strike your equipment.

Imagine lightning has just struck a nearby transformer. If the surge was powerful enough, it travelled instantaneously through wiring (AC, network, serial, phone lines and more) with the electrical equivalent force of a tidal wave. For PC users, the surge could have travelled into your computer via the AC outlet or phone lines. The first casualty is usually a modem or motherboard. Chips go next, and data is lost.

For info on different types of power problems and their effects on electronic equipment, click here.

Lightning Facts

The utility responds to overvoltages by disconnecting the grid. This creates brownouts and blackouts. If the voltage drops low enough, or blacks out, hard disks in computing machinery may crash, destroying the data stored on the disks. In all cases, work-in-progress stored in cache is instantly lost. In the worst case, password protection on the hard drives can be jumbled, or the file allocation tables may be upset, rendering the hard disks useless.

The Costs of Downtime

In the Information Age, data is quite valuable. It is the livelihood of businesses across the globe, whether in the form of financial transactions or online purchases or customer demographics or correspondence or spreadsheets or any number of business applications.

The Internet has emphasized that availability equals viability. If companies do not have reliable solutions for the continuing operation of their equipment, they lose money. If one company’s Web server goes down due to blackout, customers are apt to click over to a competitor’s. If mission-critical computers involved in manufacturing are damaged by a surge, inventory runs behind and schedules are missed. If electronic noise penetrates sensitive testing and measurement machinery, delays are inevitable.

Here are a few statistics that quantify the true costs of systems downtime:


[source: Network Computing (http://www.networkcomputing.com), March 5, 2001]
and
[source: META Group, Inc.,"Quantifying Performance Loss: IT Performance Engineering and Measurement Strategies", November 22, 2000
Clients of META Group, Inc. can read the full Delta Summary here: http://www.metagroup.com/cgi-bin/inetcgi/jsp/displayArticle.do?oid=18750

  • "Electrical interruptions will cost U.S. companies some $80 billion this year (2000)."
    [source: Worldwatch Institute (http://www.worldwatch.org)]
  • “Server downtime costs $108,000 a minute in lost brokerage operations.”
    [source: Contingency Planning Research (http://www.contingencyplanningresearch.com), a Division of Eagle Rock Alliance (http://www.eaglerockalliance.com)]
  • “Server downtime costs $43,000 a minute in lost credit card operations.”
    [source: Contingency Planning Research (http://www.contingencyplanningresearch.com), a Division of Eagle Rock Alliance (http://www.eaglerockalliance.com)]
  • “Server downtime costs $1,500 a minute in lost airline reservation operations.”
    [source: Contingency Planning Research (http://www.contingencyplanningresearch.com), a Division of Eagle Rock Alliance (http://www.eaglerockalliance.com)]
  • “Server downtime costs $1,200 a minute in lost telephone ticket sales operations.”
    [source: Contingency Planning Research (http://www.contingencyplanningresearch.com), a Division of Eagle Rock Alliance (http://www.eaglerockalliance.com)]
  • “Half of U.S. corporations rate their internet downtime costs at more than $1,000 per hour.”
    [source: Yankee Group (http://www.yankeegroup.com)]
  • “9% of U.S. corporations rate internet downtime costs at over $50,000 per hour.”
    [source: Yankee Group (http://www.yankeegroup.com)]
  • “Power outages interrupt operations at 72 percent of U.S. businesses.”
    [source: Contingency Planning & Management Online (http://www.ContingencyPlanning.com) and Ernst & Young (http://www.ey.com), 1997]
  • “Power problems (surges and lightning) were the number one cause of desktop computer loss in 1999 and 2000.”
    [source: Safeware, The Insurance Agency Inc., (http://www.safeware.com)] a member company of Assurant Group (http://www.assurant.com)]
  • “33.7% of U.S. companies have had business operations interrupted because of lightning storms.”
    [source: Contingency Planning & Management Online (http://www.ContingencyPlanning.com) and Ernst & Young (http://www.ey.com), 1997]
  • “31% of computer outages are the result of power failures.”
    [source: Contingency Planning Research (http://www.contingencyplanningresearch.com), a Division of Eagle Rock Alliance (http://www.eaglerockalliance.com)]
  • “Power disturbances account for about one third of all server failures.”
    [source: IDC (http://www.idc.com)]
  • “* Two-thirds of Silicon Valley Manufacturing Group (SVMG) member company respondents were directly impacted by the rolling blackouts.
    * The average blackout lasted 90 minutes in duration.
    * More than 100,000 workers at SVMG companies were left idle.
    * Immediate financial losses for Silicon Valley are estimated at the tens of millions of dollars, accounting for major effects like employee downtime, lost product and data, and the expense of retooling equipment.”
    [source: Silicon Valley Manufacturing Group press release (http://www.svmg.org)]
  • “According to a national survey conducted for Iomega Corporation by Bruskin Research, 57 percent of the Californian computer users surveyed fear loss of computer content due to a blackout or power failure. The survey indicates that 45 percent of computer users nationwide are concerned with losing power due to power problems.”
    [source: Iomega Corporation (http://www.iomega.com)]

In order to prevent costs involved with downtime or damaged equipment, businesses and even home owners require solutions from a vendor known for its reliability.

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Vancouver is the business capital of British C...
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BCWebnet is a division of  Fortress Internet Solutions Inc., a Canadian company incorporated in the province of British Columbia. The company is based in Vancouver, BC Canada and owns all of our servers and related equipment. At all times your data is stored safely and security in our world-class infrastructure in Canadian jurisdictions. We aren’t simply reselling another provider’s products and services like many other webhosting companies do.

Why Host Your Website In Canada?
—-
Canada has strict privacy protection laws that are recognized as compliant with privacy laws in the European Union. Canadian and European companies who host their sites in the United States are potentially breaking the law if private information is not adequately protected or disclosed contrary to Canadian or European law. This is especially a concern due to far-reaching American laws like the US Patriot Act. Hosting in Canada means your privacy and personal information is effectively and consistently protected by federal legislation.

Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act
—–
As we are a Canadian company with all our data stored in Canada, you are guaranteed that your information and website data is protected under the Canadian Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA). Unlike webhosting companies in the US, your data is covered by privacy protection laws mandated by the Canadian government. And at the moment there is no federal legislation in the US to protect personal information in the marketplace.

BCWebnet takes pride in ensuring that we comply with both the federal Canadian and British Columbia provincial regulations to protect privacy and personal information.

Do You Know Where Your Data Is?
—–
Do you know where your website data is physically stored? Do you know what legal jurisdiction the hosting company you are using falls under?

Many hosting companies are merely resellers the services of other big companies. By not asking the right questions you will never know who is ultimately keeping your data, and you can only guess where the servers are physically located – your website could be hosted any where in the world.

We firmly advocate that you locate your websites and client data in countries that protect your privacy and information with strong legislation. Make sure you know who owns the equipment and where its located before you buy.

IMPORTANT NOTICE FOR CANADIAN COMPANIES
—–
If you are using a hosting company that is US-based or has computers and/or data held in US territory, you and your customer’s information are subject to the US Patriot Act. PIPEDA explicitly states that you must disclose to your customers of the purpose for which their information is being collected. If you do not disclose to your customers that their information may also be subject to the US Patriot Act you are in breach of Canadian privacy laws.

For example, part of the US Patriot Act allows for secret “sneak and peek” search warrants to be issued without probably cause or giving notice to you and your comapny. If this were to happen to the server your website is hosted on, you would be unintentionally in breach of PIPEDA.

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The average small business does not know how to find a web designer or web developer. However, with some initial planning and careful preparation, you will be able to find a web development professional to meet your business needs.

1. Evaluate the Needs of Your Online Business Presence

Setting clear, concise goals will help you understand what your business wants to achieve from the website. Create a “Request for Proposal,” or RFP, to write these goals down and determine which website features are essential and which ones would be nice additions. A website RFP is also useful when you are recruiting and communicating with web development professionals. Download the following document to help you develop your proposal: Create an RFP for Your Website.

2. Narrow Down a Group of Web Designers/Web Developers

After creating your website RFP, you will need to shortlist a group of web development professionals. Below is a list of websites that will help you assemble your potential shortlist:

Additionally, a Google search for “Vancouver freelance web design” or “Vancouver web designers” will give you many different local web designers to consider.

When looking at the portfolios of potential web designers, think about the following questions:

  • Do I like the look and feel of their previous work?
  • Do they have quality references?
  • Have they created websites similar to what I need for my website?
  • Do they have all the technical skills required to complete the job? It’s important that whoever you choose to work with thoroughly understands the technical requirements necessary for your website.

3. Email Your Website RFP

Email your website RFP to the entire list of potential web designers you have shortlisted. Here is an easy way to do so:

  1. Compose a new email address it to yourself.
  2. Add all your potential web designers to the BCC field of your e-mail
  3. Create a clear subject line, such as “XYZ Business is looking to have a website created (RFP attached)”
  4. Write a brief introductory sentence describing your business and yourself
  5. Attach your website RFP to the e-mail, send and then wait for feedback

4. Review, Negotiate and Get Comfy.

Next you’ll be reviewing the feedback from you website RFP. There will likely be a mix of good, not-so-good and standout replies. If possible, call and make a one-on-one appointment with the candidates that stood out. Meeting the potential web designer is very important, especially since you will want to feel comfortable working together. Consider the following points when meeting a web designer:

  • There is no need to pay for an initial meet and greet
  • If you do not already have a domain name or web hosting, let the designer know you will still need to do so. It is ideal to have both registered in your business name
  • Ask for references to websites that the designer created with similar requirements to your own needs
  • It is okay to ask for a list of past clients to contact. If you do contact a reference, the only question that really matters is whether the client would work with the designer again. The only answer that matters is “Yes.”
  • It is not common that a quality web designer will develop a website mock-up for you as a free pitch to get the contract. This approach will often scare away quality talent
  • A quality web designer will listen to your plan, assess your needs, and provide constructive feedback regarding any areas of your website plan that may need improvement

5. Get Everything in Writing

After picking a web designer, commit everything about the project to writing, including:

  • Financial terms and payment schedules
  • Any legal requirements that need signing off
  • Itemized list of what and when deliverables will be provided to you by the web designer
  • Itemized list of what and when deliverables will be provided by you to the web designer
  • A project timeline outlining key milestone and final release dates
  • Having everything in writing provides both parties with a clear blueprint of what is expected.

    Following this process will help to make the process of finding a web designer an easier task. The time spent planning your website needs will make for an organized, well-communicated working relationship between yourself and the designer you choose to create your website.

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