Entries tagged with “On the Web”.


Image representing Twitter as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

The blog has been quiet for some time now, we have been doing some house cleaning. In the coming months there will be some interesting changes, one of these changes is our presence on Twitter.

Twitter is a brilliant source for News and Information. In this the first of many Twitter Monthly Roundup posts I’ll share with you some of the best articles I found related to small business online. If you would like to find us on Twitter look for @ebc_chet and @ebc_ali.

Put Ad on Web. Count Clicks. Revise (NYtimes.com)

A good read that talks about the strengths of data analysis when adevertising online.

How site personas can enhance your site. (boagworld.com)

When developing a website it’s a great idea to create user personas, it’s a great exercise for understanding the readers coming to your website. Have you overlooked you websites persona though? It’s equally as important, this article will explain why.

7 Tips for Effective Calls to Action (blog.hubspot.com)

Have you defined your websites goals? If so is your call to action statement well designed? A good read talking about the importance of well designed call to action statements.

12 Tips For Designing an Excellent Checkout Process (smashingmagazine.com)

Shopping Online can be a painful process, help ease the pain and make your customers experience shopping at your online store secure, reliable and easy.

9 Essential Principles for Good Web Design (psd.tutsplus.com)

It’s all about the details, this article is a little more web developer focused however it’s still a valuable read for any company that is relaunching or getting a new website developed.

How to Improve Your Branding With Your Content (smashingmagazine.com)

Your content is a very large part of your Companies branding online, Rick Sloboda wrote an excellent article for Smashing Magazine discussing this very topic. For all you Vancouver locals, Rick has been a long time speaker for eBusiness Connections and he has an upcoming “Writing for the Web” Seminar on June 8th. You can register for this seminar at the Small Business Education Center

Creating Your Own Deadlines and Setting Aggresive Goals for Your Business (thenetsetter.com)

A great read discussing the benefits to setting aggressive goals for your business.

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Twitter can be an invaluable tool for business networking, but most new users don’t get it at first. Learn why in this look at the four stages that the average Twitter user traverses on the path from newbie to devotee.

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There’s a strange phenomenon that happens almost every time someone joins Twitter. They hate it. At least at first.

But many of the people who once hated Twitter — or at least, didn’t quite get it in the beginning — are now many of its most active users and raving fans. So what’s going on here?

There seems to be four natural stages that the average Twitter user goes through from the point of first trying it until the point of fully embracing it and making it a part of daily life. Obviously, not everyone sticks with it and becomes a Twitter devotee, but there’s definitely a growing cadre of people who believe that there’s some magic happening in the Twittosphere

You can find me on Twitter at twitter.com/jasonhiner

Because I think Twitter can be used as a valuable business tool, it’s worth talking about the four Twitter stages in order to help recognize users in these stages when you’re choosing who to follow and to keep new Twitter users from getting discouraged and missing the opportunities available on Twitter. So here they are:

1. Confusion and indignation

When a person first signs up for Twitter, the first challenge is figuring out who to follow. Twitter now has its “Suggested Users” feature to help people get started. I’ve put together a list of technology personalities worth following on Twitter to help new techies when they sign up for Twitter.

However, even when they find some people to follow, new Twitterers usually look at their Twitter stream and start wondering, “Why would I care what my colleagues are eating for lunch?” or “What’s interesting about a software engineer posting that she’s walking her dog?”

That experience usually leads people to shake their heads and not come back to Twitter for a few days, or even weeks or months.

2. The first “Aha!” moment

Eventually, the user comes back periodically to check Twitter out of pure curiosity. During those casual forays, the person often has a first “Aha!” moment, where they find something really interesting or timely on Twitter that wasn’t available from news, RSS feeds, or word of mouth from their friends.

This could be a piece of news that someone reported on Twitter before it actually hit the wires, it could be a rumor about something that a company like Apple is doing, or even something like NFL teams announcing their picks for the draft on Twitter before they even went up to the podium to make the official selection.

3. Remembering to tweet

After the first “Aha” moment, the user typically starts checking Twitter more often, but still tends to post very infrequently. The next stage of Twitter initiation comes when the user reads something useful online or makes a mental observation about something and then thinks, “I should post that Twitter!”

At this point, the user is still relying mostly on the twitter.com homepage to access Twitter but is starting to go there at least a couple times a day to check on the latest buzz, and has typically found a good mix of friends, news feeds, industry celebrities, and thought leaders to follow.

4. Thinking in 140 characters

Once the person becomes a daily Twitter user, it’s over. The person is almost always hooked, and is now on the path to becoming a power user. This is when most (though not all) users switch from using twitter.com to using a desktop Twitter client like Tweetdeck or Seesmic.

Meanwhile, the user also often has a mobile Twitter client like UberTwitter (for BlackBerry) or Tweetie (for iPhone) in order to stay connected to the Twitter stream on the go. Those that don’t have smartphone often use Twitter via SMS text messages.

At this point, the person is a Twitter power user who regularly adds new people and brands to follow and also regularly unfollows people who post too many inane messages about their meals or just doesn’t post enough useful stuff.

The power user also tends to regularly think about and look for things to post on Twitter throughout the day, to the point of self-editing thoughts for brevity in order to fit into Twitter’s 140 character limit.

Final word

The beauty of Twitter is in its simplicity of use and the direct connection it provides to people whose activities and opinions you care about.

Apple recently wrote a case study about Twitter because Twitter uses a lot of Apple products. In the article, Apple wrote, “Twitter’s meteoric rise to ubiquity is proof positive that the world, in all its complexity, is eager to embrace simplicity.”

As I’ve written before, I think Twitter can be an very useful tool for business and technology professionals. For more, see:

And here are a couple external links worth looking at:

If you use Twitter, which of the four stages are you in?


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Now that Twitter is mainstream, its more of a necessity to have Twitter integrated to your bog theme right from start. Unfortunately themes developed prior to the Twitter revolution did not feature it nor features to add it. Here are some cool WordPress themes that will feature Twitter integrated into them by default or are inspired by the Twitter design. Also some tutorials on how to add Twitter to your blogs. Twitter all the way !

wordpress-twitter-integration

Twitter Integrated Themes

1. Pellucid Dashed -  A Simple, Clean, Artistic Wordpress theme

1 - pellucid

2. Green Park 2 – Another simple and stylish Twitter ready theme

twitter-inspired-themes-2

3. Magazine Cinco – Another magazine styled wordpress theme with Twitter integration

twitter-ready-theme-3

4. EDU Journal Theme – Twitter ready WordPress theme with lot of white space and gradients.

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5. Digital Statement – A clean professional looking theme with Twitter integrated right in.

twitter-ready-theme-5

Twitter Inspired Themes

6. Twordder – A simple Twitter inspired theme.

twitter-inspired-themes-1

7. Fresh Tweets – A Twitter clone Wordpress theme

twitter-inspired-themes-3

8. Prologue – A Twitter inspired theme from Automattic

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9. Red Trafik – A grunge style Twitter ready Wordpress theme

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10. Intaglio – Twitter integrated WordPress theme

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Bonus – Twitter – WordPress integration Tutorials

1. Twitter – Wordpress Integration guide

2. Twittersuite – Twitter and Wordpress Integrated

3. Integrating Twitter to WordPress – Lorelle

How to add Twitter to Wordpress – Video Tutorials


Daily SEO blog – SEO Tips and Social Media for the learner

10 Twitter WordPress Themes – Twitter integrated and Inspired

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Napster, Inc.
Image via Wikipedia

Twitter is receiving almost as much attention as Google receives at industry events. In this interview from SES New York, Jeff Ferguson of Napster talks about TwitterHawk and the marketing power of it.

TwitterHawk is a new tool for Twitter that is still in the developing stages. It is keyword-based and allows users to create a variety of reply phrases to respond to people with. TwitterHawk usage costs 5 cents per tweet (reply) but can be purchased in advance through a variety of packages.

In an effort to build up a client’s Twitter base, Jeff decided to use the tool for a DJ for iGlobal Radio. He used keywords such as Radiohead, alternative music, Indie-Music, etc. When someone tweeted one of those keywords, they were sent an automated response that said something similar to “If you like Radiohead, you’ll love iGlobal Radio…”

As a result, TwitterHawk helped Jeff’s client to receive many more Twitter followers and created more interactivity with his followers. On the negative side, there were a couple of people that accused Jeff’s client of spam. Jeff responded to one user and found that he didn’t like that fact that a robot was responding to him and that it was a paid service.

Jeff countered the argument by explaining that his client wrote his own copy for his responses. Also, his client’s actions were completely human but simply carried out in an automated fashion.

If users only use TwitterHawk and are not personally active on the service, then Jeff says those users could be classified as spammers. His client however, is active on Twitter and used TwitterHawk to better target his market.

What are your thoughts on TwitterHawk? Do you think it is pure marketing or does it cross the line and create a spam issue?

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Like junior high, popularity means the most

The popularity contest of blogging and gaining links and traffic doesn’t happen overnight. It takes time and work.

Content is king? Not in the heavily saturated blogosphere. Whatever idea you have, however you choose to present it, someone, somewhere will do it as well or better.

Even legendary martial artist Bruce Lee understood this. While the Little Dragon’s popularity would have earned him a massive following had he lived long enough to blog, you probably don’t have that cushion of love.

Copyblogger said you won’t get that love, or the valuable links that feed a blog. Not without working it, baby.

“Bloggers link more often to their friends than anyone else. If you write a reasonably good piece of content that interests their audience, they’ll link to you, mainly because they like you,” Copyblogger said.

Copyblogger offered some advice on earning this adoration. Some of it seems more reasonable than others, like volunteering to vote up their posts on social media sites versus writing a guest post on a popular blog. Anyone who can get into a popular blog with a guest post probably has enough high-powered friends to get links from them already.

Networking in person, commenting intelligently on their posts online, and conducting an interesting interview of the desired popular blogger offer chances at longer term relationships that could lead to inbound linking and the followers who click them.

Being ignored isn’t any fun. Neither is hard work, but without the latter, it’s difficult to resolve the former without some ultra-rare bit of serendipity happening for your blog. We think it’s better to depend on the hard work than a fleeting bit of good fortune.

By WebProNews Staff – Fri, 08/15/2008 – 12:46pm.

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