Entries tagged with “United Kingdom”.


A student at Montreal’s Concordia University says he was proud to play a role in helping to stop a school attack in the United Kingdom this week.


Canadian scientists will get better access to British research stations in the Antarctic under a new deal between the two countries. In return, it will be easier for British researchers to use Canada’s scientific facilities in the Arctic.


Mass surveillance is undermining the public right to privacy in the United Kingdom, says a committee of the House of Lords.


WASHINGTON - APRIL 6:   U.S. President George ...
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PricewaterhouseCoopers and security vendor Finjan expect insider fraud and cybercrime to rise as IT jobs are lost. Desperate IT workers who have been laid off will go rogue in 2009, selling corporate data and using crimeware, reports have predicted. The credit crunch will drive some IT workers to use their skills to steal credit-card data using phishing attacks, and abuse their privileged corporate computer access to sell off valuable financial and intellectual information, forensic experts have warned.

Both PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and security vendor Finjan are forecasting that the recession will fuel a significant rise in insider fraud and cybercrime in 2009.

A PwC forensic expert claimed the financial-services sector is already investigating a rising number of staff frauds, while Finjan cited evidence of a trend in 2008 for unemployed IT staff in Eastern Europe and Asia to use crimeware toolkits to launch phishing attacks and seed malware to steal financial details.

Neil Ysart, senior manager of forensic services at PwC, said: “People from the financial sector are all saying the same thing: there is a rise in internal investigations as everyone has seen a rise in suspected fraudulent activity.”

“There are certain types of fraud where an understanding of technology would make it easier to circumvent controls and IT staff have the knowledge to do that — for example, the theft of data at telcos,” Ysart said.

“There was a range of very well-documented frauds that took place during the recession in the early 1990s and it does not take a great deal of insight to realize we will see an increase at a time like this,” he said.

Forensic specialists at PwC are advising businesses to mount extra checks on areas where staff will be most tempted to defraud the company, such as expenses, access to sensitive customer data or massaging performance figures to win a bonus. Of the use of crimeware, Finjan’s report states: “Having the large number of layoffs of IT professionals all around the world, especially in the USA, we expect a rising number of people willing to ‘give it a try’ and to get stolen credit-card numbers, online-banking accounts and corporate data that they can use to generate income.”

A recent report by security vendor McAfee also found there is a risk that cybercrime may further slow the speed of UK economic recovery, a sentiment echoed by the joint architect of the UK’s Police Central e-Crime Unit, Charlie McMurdie.

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Top HP software execs say that, while the computing models represented by ‘the cloud’ are important, they don’t like the name or associated hype. Top HP software executives said on Tuesday that they believe in the ideas behind cloud computing, but don’t like the name of the approach or the “hype” surrounding it.

Talking at the HP Software Universe show and conference in Vienna, Tom Hogan, senior vice president for software at HP, said the company had taken time to weigh up the promise of cloud computing, which provides web-based access to remote enterprise applications and storage.

“Rather than jump in to the hype [around cloud computing] out of the gate — you can’t pick up a newspaper or a technology magazine today without reading about the cloud — we have been very deliberate over the past nine months, assessing where we think the cloud can help us”, Hogan said.

The result of that period of assessment, Hogan told ZDNet UK, was the conclusion that “just like a lot of things in technology, the cloud will not be a panacea”.

Several major technology companies have announced cloud-computing moves recently. These include Microsoft, which launched Azure, a cloud extension to its Windows franchise, Salesforce.com, Amazon and Google.

Hogan said that there will be a place for the cloud. Customers will be able to have a channel strategy for services, somewhat like the channel strategy they have for sales and marketing, he said.

According to Hogan, that means there will be three operations approaches open to enterprises: traditional in-house; outsourced; and in the cloud. “You have a host of applications that you will want to run on-premise in the traditional manner; there will be services for outsourcing (for which we have EDS); and there will be an emerging new paradigm that will aim to capitalize on the cloud,” he said.

Within that context, the cloud is important, and HP has the tools to exploit it, Hogan said. “We think that HP has more capability in fulfilling the promise for the enterprise cloud, which is a heritage strength for HP,” he said.

HP is especially well-equipped to do this, as its EDS business group can provide the processes needed for the cloud model, Hogan said. The company acquired EDS for $13.9bn (£9.37bn) in May, adding EDS’s computer-services expertise to its portfolio. Hogan’s skepticism about the hype was echoed by other executives at the conference. “A lot of people are jumping on the bandwagon of cloud, but I have not heard two people say the same thing about it,” said Andy Isherwood, HP’s vice president for software services in Europe. “There are multiple definitions out there of ‘the cloud’.”

According to Isherwood, HP prefers to talk about the software-as-a-service (SaaS) model. Isherwood told ZDNet UK: “Customers say: ‘We want solutions from you that we can buy and implement quickly. And we want to do that without investing a lot of our capital in people, equipment and software. We buy SaaS and, if it works: great. We will keep it.’”

HP has become the 10th largest company in the global SaaS market, according to Isherwood.

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